Dentistry prof suggests Addisons disease affected doomed Franklin Expedition

first_imgA professor of dentistry and his colleagues have published a theory that seeks to explain why Inuit who encountered members of the doomed Franklin Expedition in the 19th century noticed the men had hard, dry and black mouths.Russell Taichman at the University of Michigan says several explorers who interviewed Inuit who encountered the British sailors after they had abandoned their icebound ships noticed strange dental symptoms.Taichman, who is from Toronto and has long been fascinated with Sir John Franklin’s failed mission to locate the Northwest Passage, said the symptoms didn’t seem to fit other theories about what befell the crew, such as scurvy, lead poisoning or spoilage in the tinned food they carried.So, he and a librarian at the university, Mark MacEachern, began combing through medical literature to figure it out.“What kept coming up several times was tuberculosis,” said Taichman in an interview from Ann Arbor, Mich.“It was pretty common in British sailors at the time, living in close quarters.”Taichman, who typically examines how tumours spread to bone marrow, said he discussed the finding with an oncologist and hematologist Frank Cackowski, who explained that tuberculosis can cause adrenal deficiency, or Addison’s disease.Addison’s can produce the symptoms that were observed by the Inuit, Taichman said, although he noted it rarely progresses to that point in modern times.He said that long term, it can be fatal.The theory was published earlier this year in the journal Arctic.Franklin left England in 1845 with 129 men to search for a northern sea route between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. No one from the two ships ever returned, and search missions determined that both ships became icebound and were abandoned.Remains of some of the sailors have been found. The ships weren’t located until 2014 and 2016.Taichman said the descriptions of the Inuit are particularly valuable because he believes they would have noticed and remembered small details.“They’d never seen white guys before. So any weird looking things besides their skin would have been picked up. They were keen observers of nature,” Taichman said.“It would be like seeing Martians. They weren’t functioning like the people you normally knew. So it would have stuck in their minds really clearly.”Taichman said Addison’s is often a side-effect of steroid use today, but it was mostly caused by tuberculosis in the 19th century.Evidence of tuberculosis was noted in three Franklin crewmember’s bodies that were exhumed near where the ships were abandoned.Taichman said people with adrenal deficiency can’t regulate sodium well and have dry mouths from dehydration. They also have trouble keeping weight on.“The Inuit couldn’t understand why (the men) were so thin because they were carrying with them cans of food,” he said. “And the Inuit opened it up and tasted it and said, ‘Hey, it tasted pretty good.’”The Addison’s theory isn’t perfect. Even though tuberculosis may have been common in the close quarters of ships at the time, Taichman said Addison’s disease wasn’t widespread.However, he said medical literature indicates tuberculosis combined with scurvy or lead poisoning, can bring on Addison’s.High lead concentrations were observed in the recovered bones, which could have come from lead that was used for the tinned food, as well as from lead pipes on the ships that distilled drinking water.Taichman said the men were also likely suffering from scurvy and that Addison’s could have been brought on by a combination of factors.“It adds another dimension about what could have possibly happened,” Taichman said.last_img read more

Read More →

Decades of promises but little action as mercury still takes lives in

first_imgInFocusIt’s been half a century since a pulp and paper mill in Dryden, Ont. dumped 10 tonnes of mercury into the English and Wabigoon river systems, poisoning aquatic life downstream along with two communities, including Grassy Narrows, who relied on fish to survive.Since then, mercury victims have had to fight to even be acknowledged, for adequate disability money, to have the river system cleaned  up, and to keep industry from moving into the territory to unleash more mercury, this time through logging.“It’s been very slow, its been 50 years, and we keep protesting, and we keep asking and to try to improve things but it just doesn’t really get anywhere,” Grassy Narrows Chief Rudy Turtle told InFocus Host Melissa Ridgen.Some 900 people live in Grassy Narrows and health official say 90 per cent have signs of mercury poisoning, which include vision and hearing impairment, tremors, and decreased cognitive function.Yet Turtle says only five per cent meet guidelines to be disability compensation.And no one has bothered to cleanup the river system, which still tests high for mercury.Judy Da Silva, environmental health coordinator for Grassy, says the community needs action but keeps getting political lip-service.She points out that two years ago, former Indigenous Services minister Jane Philpott committed to building a mercury treatment centre in the community, much like was built by the Japanese government after residents of the village of Minamata were mercury poisoned, yet not a brick has been laid.Turtle said Indigenous Services Minister Seamus O’Regan called him just before the show, to reaffirm that Ottawa will at some point, build the treatment centre.And Ontario committed $85 million to follow the advice of scientists and cap off contaminated portions of the river system, but that too hasn’t been done.Da Silva is one of those suffering the effects of mercury poisoning.“I know I’m deteriorating, one symptom is being off balance, and that was happening to me, even an hour ago where my daughter had to help me stay balanced,” she said.“The mercury attacks the brain, you can still be really intelligent but your body gives up on you.”One thing that did happen was the Doug ford government last summer, announced those on disability will have their first cost-of-living raise since the 1980s.It saw monthly payments double to between $500 and $1,700 for those who qualify.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau insists his government wants to help but when a protester confronted him about his government’s inaction at $1,500 a plate, Liberal fundraising event in Toronto, his response was to thank the activist for her donation as she was being escorted out of the venue.He later apologized telling reporters it was disrespectful“We’re used to that kind of callous attitude to Indigenous people,” da Silva said. “We’ve been dealing with several different of governments throughout the years.“Its taken this long and we’re still protesting and we’re still out there trying to get mercury justice for our people.”Turtle said he was disappointed by Trudeau’s remarks.“I feel insulted because our people are poisoned, people are suffering, and that’s just not a proper response coming from the prime minister of Canada,” Turtle said.“We acknowledged his apology but until we see further action or get something done — like building the mercury treatment facility,  and he comes to the community to see first hand, and takes serious actions — we would see his apology is sincere.”mridgen@aptn.calast_img read more

Read More →

After strikes Moroccan Highway Company Promises to Comply with Labor Law

Rabat – Autoroutes du Maroc (ADM) has issued another statement following the strike held by its employees April on 9 -11. In a new press release published on April 16, ADM announced that the company is undertaking the necessary measures to ensure compliance with applicable labor laws.ADN stated that 1,046 employees of the company had been recruited under a indefinite-duration contract (CDI), benefiting from the advantages associated with their seniority in accordance with the law as well as their affiliation with the National Fund for Social Welfare Organization (CNSS) and Compulsory Health Insurance (AMO) as provided in the labor regulations. ADN noted in the press release that these employees, whose average salary is MAD 4,000 per month, also benefit from free transportation.The company added that the majority of these agents do not have any vocational training. Companies in charge of ADM tolls have called for human resources reinforcement under a fixed term contract during peak periods, with respect to labor legislation. read more

Read More →

Fab and their 5K run

It began as an idea 4-years ago, to teach young girls skills that would help them become strong women.Now the program known as Fab is much more than a concept. The Hamilton born charity is teaching hundreds of girls across the city how to set and achieve their goals.Maria Hayes has their story.00:00:00 | 00:00:00::Projekktor V1.3.09

Read More →

Lego sales rise but investments dent profits

COPENHAGEN — Toy maker Lego says its revenue rose 4% in the first half of 2019 but significant investments to create long-term growth led to a 12% drop in net profit.The privately-held company reported Wednesday first-half revenue of 14.8 billion kroner ($2.2 billion), while net profit dropped to 2.7 billion kroner ($400 million).CEO Niels B. Christiansen said that the group was “satisfied with our performance given the transformative shifts which continue to reshape the global toy industry.”Christiansen said that the investments were mean to grow, open new markets in China and India and develop online sales platforms, among other things.The group, which is based in Billund, Denmark, doesn’t release quarterly figures.The Associated Press

Read More →

Sierra Leonean refugees returning home from Liberia – UN agency

In a briefing to reporters in Geneva, Kris Janowski, a spokesman for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), said the agency had airlifted 10 Sierra Leonean families into the capital Freetown on Wednesday. The returnees had been living in camps around the Liberian capital, Monrovia. Arriving at the airport in Freetown, they were briefed by UNHCR and its government counterpart, the National Commission for Social Action, on what to do for the rest of their journey home. Experts from the International Committee of the Red Cross and Save the Children were also present to provide assistance like food and water, Mr. Janowski said. The returnees received a repatriation package with relief items, a transport allowance of about $9 and a four-month food ration before leaving for their home on convoys organized by UNHCR and its German partner agency, GTZ, Mr. Janowski said. He said UNHCR is working with the World Food Programme (WFP) to organize twice-weekly flights for up to 40 Sierra Leonean refugees in Liberia per week. According to UNHCR, there are still some 14,000 Sierra Leonean refugees living in Liberia’s camps. Since 2001, close to 66,300 refugees have gone back to Sierra Leone from Liberia with UNHCR assistance. This year, despite the recurring fighting, the agency has helped more than 4,000 Sierra Leonean refugees to return home by sea and air, Mr. Janowski said. read more

Read More →

Mali Ban welcomes Netherlands decision to contribute to peacekeeping mission

In a statement from his spokesperson, Mr. Ban welcomed the Government’s decision to make a “major contribution” to the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA).The Netherlands committed a major military element, including four armed helicopters, other critical assets, and approximately 380 military, police and civilian personnel, according to the statement. “This contribution dovetails with existing Dutch development cooperation efforts in Mali,” the spokesperson noted. Mr. Ban also reiterated today his call to Member States to assist MINUSMA in reaching its full authorized strength and in implementing its mandate in support of sustainable peace and security in the country. In April, the Security Council approved a 12,600-strong MINUSMA, authorizing the blue helmets “to use all necessary means” to carry out security-related stabilization tasks, protect civilians, UN staff and cultural artifacts and create the conditions for provision of humanitarian aid.MINUSMA’s core task is to support the political process in Mali, in close coordination with the African Union (AU) and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS). read more

Read More →

Week In Westminster – Week ending Friday 26 October 2012

DOWNLOAD1. Prime Minister announces Supply Chain Finance agreement2. HGV road user levy bill debated in the Commons3. Government publishes response to Transport Committee road safety report4. Science & Technology Committee holds engineering skills evidence session5. Semta launches Graduate Development Toolkit6. Week aheadClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)

Read More →

Demand for new cars declines in September as consumer and business confidence

The UK new car market declined for a sixth consecutive month in September, with 426,170 new units registered, according to figures released today by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT). Registrations fell by -9.3% in this key month, as economic and political uncertainty, and confusion over air quality plans led to a fall in consumer confidence.Demand from business, fleet and private buyers all fell in September, down -5.2%, -10.1% and -8.8% respectively. Meanwhile, registrations fell across all body types except dual-purpose, which grew 2.4%. The biggest declines were seen at opposite ends of the market with both luxury saloons and superminis falling -36.4% and 21.2% respectively.Demand for alternatively fuelled vehicles (AFVs) continued to accelerate in September however, surging 41.0% in the month and 34.6% year-to-date, with nearly 95,000 leaving forecourts this year. However, this couldn’t compensate for declines in registrations of petrol cars, down -1.2%, and, especially, diesel which fell for the sixth consecutive month, down -21.7%.Confusion surrounding air quality plans has inevitably led to a drop in consumer and business demand for diesel vehicles, which is undermining the roll out of the latest low emissions models and thwarting the ambitions of both industry and government to meet challenging CO2 targets. Indeed, if new diesel registrations continue on this negative trend, UK average new car CO2 levels could actually rise this year, the first time such an increase would have occurred since average CO2 emissions were recorded.2 So far this year 485,067 diesel vehicles have been produced in the UK, and maintaining strong demand for the latest new diesel vehicles is essential for the health of the UK automotive sector that employs over 814,000 people.Year-to-date, new car registrations have fallen -3.9%. But, overall, the market remains at a historically high levels with over 2 million vehicles hitting UK roads so far this year.Mike Hawes, SMMT Chief Executive, said,September is always a barometer of the health of the UK new car market so this decline will cause considerable concern. Business and political uncertainty is reducing buyer confidence, with consumers and businesses more likely to delay big ticket purchases. The confusion surrounding air quality plans has not helped, but consumers should be reassured that all the new diesel and petrol models on the market will not face any bans or additional charges. Manufacturers’ scrappage schemes are proving popular and such schemes are to be encouraged given fleet renewal is the best way to address environmental issues in our towns and cities.NotesThe September market last declined in 2011, by -0.8%.UK average new car CO2 levels have been recorded since 2000Download the press release and data table.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) UK new car market falls for sixth consecutive month in September – down -9.3% to 426,170 units.First time the important September market has fallen in six years.1Demand for alternatively fuelled vehicles continues to accelerate, up 41.0% last month, while petrol falls -1.2% and diesel declines -21.7%.SEE CAR REGISTRATIONS BY BRAND read more

Read More →

BelAZ75710 dumper truck powered by Siemens driving gear lays a claim to

first_imgBelAZ-75710, the world’s largest mining two-axle all-wheel-drive rear-dump truck with weight-carrying capacity of 450 t demonstrated the performance worth of an entry in the Guinness Book of Records. The new vehicle rolled out of the BelAZ plant in late 2013 is being field tested as the biggest machine of its class with a record breaking capacity. To suit the needs of the gigantic haul truck, Siemens developed a unique AC traction drive system, MMT500. The system is comprised of four 1,200 kW electric motors, two traction generators, three blowers, a brake resistor unit and a control cabinet with two ELFA inverters.As opposed to its predecessors, the new truck is provided with eight wheels, each designed for about 100 tons of load. Therefore, Siemens traction division experts chose to develop a reliable and powerful all-wheel drive train with four electrical machines. The use of the all-wheel gear has opened up new possibilities of distributing tractive effort to both axles. Further, in case of failure of one of the driving gears, an emergency mode can be activated, which would enable the dumper to get to the service station without being towed. The traction motors for the electric gear were manufactured at Siemens facilities in Nürnberg. The project was completed in a comparatively short term: the development process from ordering to commissioning took less than two years.Siemens has been developing drive systems for mining trucks for many years. Currently, the company supplies BelAZ OJSC with AC traction electric drives for 240 t and 360 t trucks.BELAZ-75710 is the first vehicle in the class of super-high-load trucks having a weight-carrying capacity of 450 t. It is over 20 m long, nearly 10 m wide and 8 m high. The turning diameter is about 20 m. Siemens says “the truck has embodied the latest technological solutions ensuring its high efficiency, reliability, manoeuvrability and smooth running as well as the driver’s comfort and safety. The vehicle maximum speed is 64 km/h. BelAZ-75710 is in high demand in the mines of Kuzbass region of the Russian Federation and in certain mines of Chile and North America. The first truck is due to set off to one of the open mines of Kuzbass coalfield.last_img read more

Read More →

Deal signed with Central American leaders to prevent migration

first_img KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Today the Trump administration announced the signing of a deal with Central American leaders to help prevent migration at the source.Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and her security counterparts in El Salvador,Guatemala, and Honduras signed the first-ever multi-lateral agreement in Honduras this week.They vow to jointly address the underlying issues country’s face that cause the mass numbers of citizens migrating away.The deal will also help stop future caravans from embarking on journeys to the U.S., which will put less pressure on our immigration system.Joining KUSI to discuss the flow of migrants currently at our border is Political Analyst and KUSI Contributor Esther Valdes KUSI Newsroom, Deal signed with Central American leaders to prevent migration Posted: March 28, 2019 March 28, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News, National & International News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Read More →

Shifts fuel worldwide push for legal pot

first_imgIn a former colonial mansion in Jamaica, politicians huddle to discuss trying to ease marijuana laws in the land of the late reggae musician and cannabis evangelist Bob Marley. In Morocco, one of the world’s top producers of the concentrated pot known as hashish, two leading political parties want to legalize its cultivation, at least for medical and industrial use.And in Mexico City, the vast metropolis of a country ravaged by horrific cartel bloodshed, lawmakers have a brand new proposal to let stores sell the drug.From the Americas to Europe to North Africa and beyond, the marijuana legalization movement is gaining unprecedented traction — a nod to successful efforts in Colorado, Washington and the small South American nation of Uruguay, which in December became the first country to approve nationwide pot legalization.Leaders long weary of the drug war’s violence and futility have been emboldened by changes in U.S. policy, even in the face of opposition from their own conservative populations. Some are eager to try an approach that focuses on public health instead of prohibition, and some see a potentially lucrative industry in cannabis regulation.“A number of countries are saying, ‘We’ve been curious about this, but we didn’t think we could go this route,’” said Sam Kamin, a University of Denver law professor who helped write Colorado’s marijuana regulations. “It’s harder for the U.S. to look at other countries and say, ‘You can’t legalize, you can’t decriminalize,’ because it’s going on here.”last_img read more

Read More →

Putin vows to respect Ukraine election

first_imgST. PETERSBURG, Russia — President Vladimir Putin pledged Friday that Russia will respect the results of Ukraine’s presidential election, a strong indication the Kremlin wants to cool down the crisis. But new violence and rebel vows to block the balloting made prospects for peace appear distant.New clashes were reported between pro-Russia separatists and government forces in eastern Ukraine as Kiev continued an offensive to try to halt the uprising.Associated Press reporters saw two dead Ukrainian soldiers near the village of Karlivka, and another body near a rebel checkpoint, both in the Donetsk region. A rebel leader said 16 more people died Friday in fighting there — 10 soldiers, four rebels and two civilians — but there was no immediate way to verify his statement.In Kiev, the Defense Ministry said 20 insurgents were killed in an attack on a convoy of government troops Thursday by about 500 rebels, the largest insurgent assault yet reported. The clash could not be independently confirmed and it was unclear why such a large attack in a populated region would have gone unreported for more than a day. The ministry also said one soldier was killed Friday near the same area.On Thursday, 16 troops were killed near the separatist stronghold of Donetsk in the deadliest raid yet on Ukrainian troops.Ukraine’s caretaker president urged all voters to take part in Sunday’s crucial ballot to “cement the foundation of our nation.” Yet it was uncertain whether any voting could take place in the east, where rebels who declared the Donetsk and Luhansk regions independent have vowed to block what they call an election for the leader of a foreign country.last_img read more

Read More →

UN chief urges restraint by Myanmar forces as death toll mounts

first_imgUN chief Antonio Guterres warned Friday of a looming humanitarian catastrophe in western Myanmar and urged security forces to show restraint after hundreds were reported dead in communal violence and thousands continued to flee.It is the bloodiest chapter yet in a bitter five-year crisis that has torn apart Rakhine state along ethnic and religious lines, displaced the region’s Rohingya community in huge numbers and heaped international condemnation on Myanmar’s army and the government of Aung San Suu Kyi.Around 400 people-most of them Rohingya Muslims-have died in the violence, according to the army chief’s office Friday, while the UN says 38,000 have sought refuge across the border in Bangladesh.A further 20,000 Rohingya have massed along the Bangladeshi frontier, barred from entering the South Asian country, while scores of desperate people have drowned attempting to cross the Naf, a border river, in makeshift boats.Reports of massacres and the systematic torching of villages by security forces-as well as by militants-have further amplified tensions, raising fears that violence in Rakhine is spinning out of control.“The secretary-general is deeply concerned by the reports of excesses during the security operations conducted by Myanmar’s security forces in Rakhine State and urges restraint and calm to avoid a humanitarian catastrophe,” said a UN spokesman.Guterres recalled that it was the government’s responsibility to provide security and allow aid agencies to reach those in need.The army chief’s office on Friday gave the updated death toll, sketching out the details of an insurgency that has escalated sharply.“Until August 30, a large number of terrorists carried out 52 waves of attacks on security forces…. in those attacks, 370 bodies of terrorists were found and nine others captured alive,” a statement posted on Facebook said.Fifteen security forces and 14 civilians have also died in eight days of fighting, it added.Erdogan says ‘genocide’ -Rakhine has been the crucible of religious violence since 2012, when riots erupted killing scores of Rohingya and forcing tens of thousands of people-the majority from the Muslim minority-into displacement camps.The latest round of violence erupted last Friday when Rohingya militants swarmed remote police posts, killing 15 officials and burning villages.Myanmar security forces have launched “clearance” operations to sweep out insurgents whose ranks appear to be swelling as male Rohingya villagers join their cause.Rights groups, who believe the true death toll is much higher, allege massacres of Rohingya in remote villages led by Myanmar security forces and ethnic Rakhine Buddhist mobs.The Rohingya are reviled in Myanmar, where the roughly one million-strong community are accused of being illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.Fortify Rights, an NGO with a focus on Myanmar, said eyewitnesses alleged mobs shot and hacked down Rohingya villagers-including children-in a five-hour “killing spree” in the village of Chut Pyin in Rathedaung township on Sunday afternoon.The allegations could not be independently verified by AFP as the area is off-limits to reporters.Myanmar’s Information Committee appeared earlier this week to confirm a major security operation took place around the village on Sunday afternoon as a patrol clashed with scores of Rohingya militants.But in a complex situation, further muddied by the swirl of claims and denials by both sides, more accounts emerged accusing Myanmar forces of killings and widespread abuse.A 23-year-old Rohingya woman from Kyet Yoe Pyin said she had witnessed soldiers and Buddhist mobs rape and kill Muslims in her village over the weekend.“They mercilessly slaughtered men, women and children,” she told AFP by telephone from Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh where she has fled. The claims could not be verified by AFP.Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Friday accused Myanmar of “genocide” against the Rohingya in a speech in Istanbul during the Islamic Eid al-Adha feast.Erdogan said he would bring up the issue at the next UN General Assembly in New York later this month, adding that he had already talked to Guterres and other Muslim leaders.Bodies in the water -Desperate to reach Bangladesh, thousands of Rohingya have taken to boats-or clung to flotsam-in an effort to cross the Naf river which separates the two countries. But others died trying.Eighteen bodies washed ashore in Bangladesh on Friday, according to Bangladeshi border officials, lifting the toll over the last two days to 41.More than 400 Hindus from Rakhine have also crossed into Bangladesh, after armed men attacked their village, killing and looting.It is the first time in Rakhine’s bitter and bloody crisis that Hindus have fled-a sign violence is billowing out.Thousands of ethnic Rakhine Buddhists and other local ethnic groups have also been displaced-the apparent targets of militants who are fighting under the banner of the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA).The ARSA emerged as a force in October last year when their attacks killed Myanmar border police, prompting a crackdown by security forces.The United States on Thursday urged the military to protect civilians, while Yanghee Lee, the UN’s special rapporteur on human rights in Myanmar, said the “worsening cycle of violence” was “of grave concern”.last_img read more

Read More →

A Rocky Appearance For DeVos On 60 Minutes

first_img Share 60 Minutes/Screenshot by NPREducation Secretary Betsy DeVos stumbles during her interview with Lesley Stahl on CBS’s 60 Minutes.“Why have you become, people say, the most hated Cabinet secretary?” Lesley Stahl asked Education Secretary Betsy DeVos in a 60 Minutes interview that is drawing lots of attention.“I’m not so sure how exactly that happened,” DeVos responded in the interview, which aired Sunday night on CBS.DeVos rarely gives interviews outside outlets like conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt. But she had some news to discuss. Sunday, President Trump named her head of a new commission on school safety in response to the Parkland shooting.That appointment came after yet another example of the controversy that has marked her tenure as secretary: a visit by DeVos to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last week that was angrily criticized by some students on social media.“I give a lot of credit to the students for raising their voices,” DeVos told Stahl.“They want gun control,” Stahl responded.DeVos responded: “They want a variety of things. They want solutions.”During her confirmation hearing last year, DeVos memorably supported the idea of arming teachers — perhaps against grizzly bears, she joked.She reiterated that support Sunday night, in line with Trump’s support for the idea: “It should be an option for schools to consider. … No one size fits all.”Educators, teachers unions and some policy experts have been critical of the idea. A new working paper from Johns Hopkins argues this would be both risky and ineffective.The 13-minute segment had several uncomfortable moments. DeVos often seemed at a loss for words as Stahl probed many of the most controversial points in her brief career as secretary: her faux pas about historically black colleges; the rollback of transgender student protections and Title IX sexual assault regulations on campuses; efforts to reduce racial disparities in school discipline. And, of course, her support for school choice, as pursued through vouchers and charters.DeVos is the wealthiest Cabinet member, the segment pointed out. Her family’s investments have included K12 Inc., a for-profit virtual school company.Stahl questioned DeVos on her decades of philanthropic intervention in the school system in Michigan, where her family has promoted a free market approach to school choice, including for-profit operators of charter schools that receive taxpayer funding.Studies have found poor performance, particularly in Detroit. Asked whether public schools in Michigan have improved, DeVos answered: “I don’t know. Overall, I can’t say overall that they have all gotten better.”“Have you seen the really bad schools?” Stahl persisted. “I have not intentionally visited the schools that are underperforming,” DeVos answered.“Maybe you should.”“Maybe I should, yes.”Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Read More →

The Iconic Chevrolet Corvair in Video – Offspring of the Corvette and

first_imgIn 1959, on the brink of a new decade, General Motors introduced a hot new car to the public ― the Chevrolet Corvair. The automobile hit the market the following year and people hurried to their registered dealers across the country. During the first two days alone, more than 26,000 units were sold, constituting around 13 percent of total Chevrolet sales for the year. The name itself is a portmanteau of two other models ― the Corvette and Bel Air ― promising to combine the best traits of both cars.1964 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Photo by Greg Gjerdingen CC BY 2.0It appeared as though a sort of a craze caught up with the public, as the sporty Corvair became one of Chevrolet’s most popular models. Its main feature was the rear-mounted, air-cooled engine, similar to European models such as the Volkswagen Beetle, Porsche 911 and the Tatra 77.The model was manufactured in several different variants, ranging from the two-door coupe convertible all the way to a pickup truck and even a commercial van.However, by 1965, its reputation was seriously shaken, for that was the year when consumer advocate Ralph Nader decided to draw attention to how unsafe cars of the time actually were. Unfortunately for Chevrolet, the Corvair turned out to be the example car on which he demonstrated some very “lethal” points.Chevrolet Corvair cabriolet Photo by Charles01 CC BY-SA 3.0Nader’s best-selling book Unsafe at Any Speed almost toppled the U.S. automobile industry.While Nader continues to work as a political activist, author, lecturer, and attorney, the very beginning of his career was marked by his criticism towards various specific flaws regarding safety regulations which could be applied to most of Corvair’s contemporaries such as the Ford Falcon, Plymouth Valiant, Studebaker Lark, and the Rambler American.The Corvair, in particular, received criticism on issues concerning its unsafe swing-axle suspension design, which Nader considered could result in dangerous oversteer.Sales of the Corvair plummeted, and by the end of the decade, production had ceased.However, in the 1970s, General Motors managed to prove that their model was no different when it came to safety then its competitors from Ford and Chrysler. Nevertheless, the damage had already been done and the Corvair was history.Read another story from us: Rugged Workhorse of the Army – The Original Jeep in VideoLater on, many believed that the Corvair’s fate was indeed a tragic one. The initial flaws were fixed on later variants, but its reputation was already ruined.last_img read more

Read More →

Lorry driver arrested on suspicion of drinkdriving after accident on M6

first_imgGet the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailA lorry driver has been arrested for being over the limit following an accident on the motorway during the rush hour this morning. Two lanes of M6 Northbound were closed for around 30 minutes following the crash, which involved a HGV and a car, between Junction 17 (Sandbach/Crewe) and Junction 18 just before 8.30pm. The northbound carriageway was then shut for around 20 minutes while the route was cleared. Congestion was reported as far back as Sandbach Service station. There are still severe delays in the area and the driver of the HGV has now been arrested for allegedly being over the drink-drive limit. A North West Motorways Police spokesman said: “M6 Northbound J17/18 now fully open. Read MoreStoke-on-Trent City Council insists ‘Hanley is safe place to visit’ as rape investigation enters fifth day “HGV driver has been arrested – over the prescribed limit of alcohol.”last_img read more

Read More →

OpenSSH now a part of the Windows Server 2019

first_imgYesterday, Microsoft announced that the OpenSSH client and server are available as a supported feature-on-Demand in Windows Server 2019 and Windows 10 1809. OpenSSH is a collection of client/server utilities allowing secure login, remote file transfer, and public/private key pair management. It originated as a part of the OpenBSD project and has been used across the BSD, Linux, macOS, and Unix ecosystems, for years. In 2015, Microsoft said they would build OpenSSH into Windows, while also making contributions to its development. The Win32 port of OpenSSH was first included in the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update and Windows Server 1709 as a pre-release feature. With OpenSSH in the Windows Server 2019, organizations can work across a broad range of operating systems and also utilize a consistent set of tools for remote server administration. The community welcomes OpenSSH on Windows Server 2019 According to some on HackerNews, “Having used DSC and PowerShell remoting extensively, these create as many problems as they solve. Nothing works smoothly. Not a thing. The saving grace here will be SSH because then at least we can drive all our kit across both platforms from Ansible and be done with the entire MSFT management stack.” Another review says, “Mounting requires other ports to be opened, which no sysadmin will do on the internet. Ssh, on the other hand, can be started on a non-standard port.” “SSH is an awesome tool & capability as a relatively high-level network channel. The defacto “shell” approach leads to a lot of problems when used as a management device. It encourages ad-hoc, unstructured, and opaque changes. Managing your hosts via Secure Shell simply leads to bespoke, unrepeatable, outcomes and crushing debt.” To know more about this news in detail, visit the Windows official blog. Read Next Microsoft fixes 62 security flaws on Patch Tuesday and re-releases Windows 10 version 1809 and Windows Server 2019 Microsoft releases first test build of Windows Server 1803 How to use PowerShell Web Access to manage Windows Serverlast_img read more

Read More →