Granit Xhaka almost rips the net with Switzerland wonder goal – on his weak foot

first_imgHenrik Dalsgaard’s last-gasp strike rescued a point for Denmark (Picture: Getty)Switzerland manager Petkovic admits his side’s ‘naivety’ allowed Denmark back into the game.‘We were a little naive when  the goals were conceded. We lost some too many contests in the second half and we were punished,’ he said after the final whistle.More: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira moves‘We started to suffer after their first goal, especially on high balls.‘With a little more physicality we could have made it.’ Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterTuesday 26 Mar 2019 10:52 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link348Shares Advertisement Comment Granit Xhaka scored an incredible goal before Switzerland’s implosion (Picture: Getty)Granit Xhaka found the net with a stunning strike for Switzerland before they threw away a three-goal lead in a dramatic Euro 2020 qualifying clash with Denmark.Xhaka is enjoying his most consistent season for Arsenal following Unai Emery’s arrival last summer and the midfielder once again displayed his impressive form – this time on the international stage.Switzerland began their qualification campaign with a convincing 2-0 win away to Georgia at the weekend and got off to the perfect start versus Denmark in their second Group D match on Tuesday night.Remo Freuler put Vladimir Petkovic’s men in front in the 19th minute and Xhaka looked to have wrapped up a comfortable victory with a thunderous strike midway through the second half.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityXhaka, whose confidence levels are clearly sky high, beat Kasper Schmeichel from distance and the Leicester City goalkeeper had no chance.Not bad for Xhaka’s weaker foot…Granit Xhaka with a rocket 🚀What a strike.#SUIDEN #Euro2020 #VMSport pic.twitter.com/BylE1S4Kwf— Virgin Media Sport (@VMSportIE) March 26, 2019 Breel Embolo extended Switzerland’s lead ten minutes later and Xhaka was substituted in the 79th minute.Switzerland, though, allowed Denmark back into the game and three goals in the final ten minutes secured an incredible 3-3 draw for the away side.Mathias Jorgensen, Christian Gytkjaer and Henrik Dalsgaard all got on the scoresheet as Switzerland imploded at St. Jakob-Park.The result means Switzerland and Denmark remain second and third in Group D, with the Republic of Ireland two points clear at the top. Granit Xhaka almost rips the net with Switzerland wonder goal – on his weak foot Southgate ‘saddened’ by racist abuse post-Montenegro victoryTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 13:44FullscreenSouthgate ‘saddened’ by racist abuse post-Montenegro victoryhttps://metro.co.uk/video/southgate-saddened-racist-abuse-post-montenegro-victory-1890760/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.MORE: Louis van Gaal takes swipe at Ole Gunnar Solskjaer over Manchester United stylelast_img read more

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Locking fewer kids up? Indiana ahead of the curve

first_imgLegislative updates would reward states for locking up fewer kids. (Photo credit: Jan Vargas/Flickr.)INDIANAPOLIS – Congress is set to consider updating a decades-old law that guides states on the custody and care of juveniles in the criminal-justice system.The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act was introduced late last week, and one big change would be providing incentives to states to lock up fewer children.Time in detention can cause harm that follows kids for the rest of their lives, said investigative journalist Nell Bernstein.“The ones that we incarcerate,” she said, “are twice as likely, when you control for everything under the sun including the delinquent act, to end up as adult prisoners.”Indiana is among states moving away from incarcerating young offenders in favor of community-based rehabilitation, through the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative. In 2006, Marion County became the first JDAI site and reduced its detention admissions by 65 percent by 2012. Eleven more Indiana counties have joined the initiative, bringing the total to 19.Decades ago, if a young person acted up in school, they went to the principal’soffice, Bernstein said. Now, they go to a school-based police officer, in what has become the most common entry point into the criminal justice system. She said research backs up her belief that new techniques are needed to redirect troubled kids.“There are not two kinds of kids, ‘good’ and ‘bad.’ It’s a developmental phase,” she said. “What the research also shows is those kids who go through that developmental phase, commit those illegal acts but are not incarcerated – those kids grow up and grow out of it.”Bernstein advocates for closing most juvenile detention facilities, saying treating the underlying issues closer to kids’ homes has been proved to be more effective.State leaders say the JDAI model has shown to encourage children to finish school, reduce recidivism and save money on detention costs.Mary Kuhlmanlast_img read more

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Patchy dense fog possible through mid-morning

first_imgSoutheastern Indiana—Be aware of patchy dense fog possible through mid-morning.Areas of fog have developed over the region and will continue through sunrise. Locally dense fog will be possible, which may reduce visibilities to a quarter-mile or less at times. Fog isexpected to lift between 8 AM EDT and 10 AM EDT.If you are planning to travel this morning, be prepared to allow extra time to reach your destination. Use low beam headlights and allow more distance between you and the vehicle in front of you.last_img

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Ellsworth volleyball has new coach

first_imgELLSWORTH — The Ellsworth volleyball team has a new head coach.Whitney Ranger, who played Division II volleyball at Dominican College in New York, has replaced longtime head coach Michael Kelley.“The only way I could really stay in volleyball was to coach,” Ranger said. “I love it. It’s really fun.”Ranger, 24, moved to Maine from California about a year and a half ago and is working as a special education teacher at Ellsworth Elementary-Middle School.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textShe has big plans for the 3-3 Eagles.“I want us to get to playoffs,” she said. “I think we can do it.”TuesdayEllsworth 3, Bucksport 0SaturdayMDI 3, Thornton 1Thornton 3, Ellsworth 0FridaySumner 3, Narraguagus 2ThursdayWA 3, MDI 1Machias 3, Ellsworth 0WednesdayEllsworth 3, WA 2Calais 3, Sumner 0last_img read more

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India seal series 2-0

first_imgINDIA made a rapid 97-run opening partnership, and a blistering finish from Manish Pandey and Shardul Thakur, accounted for a total of 201 for 6.Their bowlers scythed through Sri Lanka’s top order, removing four batsmen inside the Powerplay, allowing Sri Lanka no more than 35 runs during the field restrictions, to derail their daunting chase.There was a half-decent 31 from Angelo Mathews and an excellent 57 off 36 balls – the highest individual score in the game – from Dhananjaya de Silva. Left-arm wrist-spinner Lakshan Sandakan also took 3 for 35 from his four overs.India also had outstanding personal contributions with Shikhar Dhawan and KL Rahul making half-centuries, while Navdeep Saini finished with 3 for 28 – the second time in as many matches that he has impressed. More than their individual performances, however, India ensured there were few weak performances in their XI. They won by a whopping 78, bowling Sri Lanka out in the 16th over.INDIA’S SCORCHING STARTThirty runs apiece for each of India’s batsmen in the Powerplay. Sixty-three overall for India. Rahul and Dhawan didn’t stop there though. They stuck together for several more overs – their partnership worth 97 off 65 balls. It set the tone for yet another match that India would dominate – the hosts’ total almost certain to breach 170 after that stand.It was Rahul who looked menacing first, stroking Lasith Malinga through point in the first over, before hitting Mathews (playing his first T20 international since mid-2018) for successive boundaries in the next over. Dhawan had a nervous start. He could have been caught on 1 off the bowling of Mathews, had Dasun Shanaka judged the chance better at deep square leg.By the end of the Powerplay, though, both batsmen were striking serenely – Dhawan helping shortish fast deliveries past third man, while Rahul was languidly launching de Silva’s off-spin over long leg. Rahul made 54 off 36, and Dhawan 52 off 36. The pair had given India such a mighty platform, Virat Kohli even mixed up the batting order, and let Sanju Samson, Pandey and Shreyas Iyer all bat ahead of him.THE FINISHING FIREWORKSWhen Sri Lanka claimed wickets in quick succession through the middle overs, it felt like perhaps they could restrict India to the vicinity of 180. At the end of the 18th over, India were 167 for 6. Pandey had been batting nicely for several overs, but it was Thakur who really got the death-overs party started.He bludgeoned Malinga for six off the second ball he faced, then next over smoked Lahiru Kumara over the straight boundary, and then cracked him serenely over extra cover. Pandey hit two fours of his own through this period. Together, they put on 37 off 15 balls, and turned an imposing total into a gigantic one.INDIA BLAST SRI LANKA’S TOP ORDERIt was pretty much over by the time the Powerplay ended. Danushka Gunathilaka tried to pull Jasprit Bumrah from a terrible position, and spooned a catch to mid-on. Avishka Fernando struck a gorgeous six over midwicket off Thakur, but then sliced one straight to point next ball. Oshada Fernando was run-out due to a mix-up, and Kusal Perera backed away and was bowled by Saini in the sixth over.With no batsmen in form, it was almost impossible to see Sri Lanka coming back from 26 for 4. Mathews and Dhananjaya staged a 72-run fifth-wicket partnership, but the stand needed to be pretty much twice that size for the visitors to have a chance.last_img read more

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MBB : NARROW ESCAPE: Late run powers Syracuse comeback in win over UConn in Big East tournament

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 7, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Mark: mcooperj@syr.edu | @mark_cooperjr Commentscenter_img NEW YORK — Dion Waiters shook off Ryan Boatright with ease. Driving from the left wing, Waiters stopped on a dime at the left elbow.Boatright kept going. Down one point, Waiters was left with no one in front of him and a free throw to give Syracuse the lead.‘I just gave a little hesitation. I saw he wasn’t in the picture no more,’ Waiters said. ‘And I just said: This is a foul shot. I stayed there, shot it, kept my follow through.’The jumper put Syracuse ahead by one with 5:46 left. Syracuse and Connecticut struggled offensively all game, and UConn led for 11 consecutive second-half minutes, but the Orange found enough late. No. 2 Syracuse (31-1) held on for a 58-55 win over defending tournament champion Connecticut (20-13) in the Big East quarterfinals Thursday, in front of a sellout crowd of 20,057 in Madison Square Garden. The Orange shot 38.5 percent for the game but turned the ball over only four times.A lineup of Waiters, James Southerland, Brandon Triche, Kris Joseph and Fab Melo played for most of the second half. Waiters’ 18 points on 8-of-11 shooting and some key shots by James Southerland propelled SU ahead.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse moves on to the semifinals, where it will play Cincinnati on Friday at 7 p.m.‘Both teams struggled shooting the ball, and both teams are very good defensively,’ SU head coach Jim Boeheim said. ‘We couldn’t really get anything going offensively, and then we changed something just a little bit. Got a little bit more space.’Led by Waiters 10 points in seven first-half minutes, Syracuse clung to a 27-24 lead at halftime. But the Huskies gained momentum early in the second half.With the game tied at 29, Boatright came up with a rebound and pushed the ball ahead. The UConn guard drove into Triche and drew a foul while making the basket inside. It instigated a 10-2 Huskies run that put them ahead 39-31.‘They were in great position, and I thought our guys just dug down on defense, played a little bit harder and got going on offense,’ Boeheim said. ‘It was a great comeback.’Boeheim stuck with the same five on the floor for the entire comeback. Scoop Jardine played the first three minutes of the second half and never returned. C.J. Fair, who made his fourth start of the season, saw five minutes in the final 20.Syracuse began to mount a comeback. Standing at the top of the key, Melo fired a pass to Waiters cutting to the hoop from the left side. The layup brought SU within six.With 10:31 left, Joseph drove from the left side and spun into Jeremy Lamb, using his size advantage to draw the Huskies forward’s third foul and the team’s seventh. In a one-and-one situation, Joseph made both free throws, bringing the score to 42-39.‘We knew we had to make stops, and we knew we had to make shots at the other end,’ Melo said. ‘And Kris Joseph did a great job going to the basket. They’re fouling him and he made some free throws.’As the game grew tenser, Waiters and Southerland became the go-to players for the Orange.Melo went up for a layup with Syracuse down 47-43, and Andre Drummond flew through to swat it. The block ricocheted to Triche, who quickly fed Southerland at the top of the key for a 3 to bring SU back within one.‘I think James is a very, very good offensive player, and I think he hasn’t scratched his potential,’ Boeheim said. ‘He’s getting better every day. He’s got to help us more on the boards, but he’s a tremendous shooter.’Two minutes went by without any points until Waiters’ pull-up jumper gave Syracuse the lead. And on Syracuse’s first possession since taking the lead, it went back to Southerland.This time, the Orange forward drilled a 3 over UConn forward Tyler Olander, pushing the lead to four and forcing UConn head coach Jim Calhoun to use a timeout.Southerland and Waiters met near midcourt for an emphatic chest bump.‘He can make those shots, and he made them early in the year,’ Boeheim said. ‘He struggled a little bit during the week, but he’s been making them in practice.’Southerland also sank a jumper from the right baseline to put the Orange ahead 55-49 with 1:14 to play. The shot sealed a win for Syracuse, which held the Huskies without a field goal for 7:07 late in the second half to take control of the game.Syracuse did just enough to survive and beat UConn for the third time this season.‘I thought they’d make it hard for us,’ Calhoun said. ‘That’s when they had a couple plays and we didn’t. I think you could probably play that back and find — you could make an easy way for Connecticut to win that game, just the way it played out.’mcooperj@syr.edulast_img read more

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Q&A: Former Syracuse running back Drummond talks about being mentored by Maryland head coach Edsall

first_imgMaryland head coach Randy Edsall was a quarterback at Syracuse from 1976-79 before starting an 11-year coaching career with the Orange. Robert Drummond was a running back for Syracuse from 1985-88, and Edsall was SU’s running backs coach for parts of Drummond’s four years. Here’s what Drummond told The Daily Orange about Edsall as a coach with the Orange. The Daily Orange: What comes to mind when you think of Randy Edsall at Syracuse?Robert Drummond: The fact that he coached me when I was there at Syracuse. He basically was the type of coach, when I was a freshman, that got the most out of me by simply in practice, teaching me how to maximize my practice time. Taking every play and no matter where I was at, running it into the end zone, always maximizing that effort in practice so when game time came around, it was natural.The D.O.: How well was Edsall able to not only cater to your skills as a running back, but also the other running backs with different styles?AdvertisementThis is placeholder textR.D.: Being a freshman and not understanding what was going on and being involved in a starting job at a young age, it was a testament to him being able to get the best of my ability as a coach. We had four running backs, but him being able to go in there and get the best of my ability and allow me to be all set as a freshman says a lot to the kind of coach he was.The D.O.: What about his coaching style has enabled him to move up the coaching ranks?R.D.: The simple fact that he can get players and other coaches to buy in what he’s trying to sell. I’m a product of the Edsall tutelage at an early age so I understand what they believe in him and what he gets out of them in practice.The D.O.: Do you have any specific memories of Edsall that stand out? R.D.: It was a short-yardage play and I remember we were backed up in our end zone and we were just practicing. Probably on the 5-yard line, I remember getting a handoff and running about five or 10 yards downfield and just stopped to turn around and come back. And Coach Edsall said to me, “Robert, what are you doing?” I’m like, “What are you talking about?” He’s like, “Get in the end zone, suppose you break a long run.” I was like, “Seriously?” He’s like, “Yeah.” So I turned it on and sprinted into the end zone but then I had to sprint all the way back and get ready for the next play. I prepared myself for games like that, where I would always sprint into the end zone no matter where I was at. It got me in great shape and it taught me the aspect of getting the ball in the end zone and doing the things to prepare and get you ready to play football. Comments Published on September 19, 2014 at 12:15 am Contact Matt: mcschnei@syr.edu | @matt_schneidman Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Second half goal lifts Syracuse past Albany, 1-0

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ The Orange improved in the second half, but Bradley said that her team is still not close to where she wants them to be. With four top 15 teams on the schedule for the next four games, the Orange has to improve its energy and consistency everywhere, Bradley said.“The aggression that they brought in the second half is a base level of where we need to be this season,” Bradley said. “It’s a good thing that I could show them this is the first step to being aggressive in the ACC.”She added: “We’re still a long way from that.” Two minutes into the second half, the referee’s whistle blew for a foul against Albany. Senior captain Roos Weers raced into the circle and ran up to the referee and waved her arms. The call was a free hit outside the circle for Syracuse, but Weers didn’t see it that way: it should have been a corner.A review deemed that the foul for a dangerous high ball occurred inside the area, setting up the corner. It led to a Weers score that helped No. 11 Syracuse (2-0) secure a 1-0 win over No. 25 Albany in the second game of the season. Commentscenter_img “They thought the ball was outside the circle,” Weers said. “I thought it was inside the circle. Any player can review anything that leads up to a goal.”Syracuse had not produced an attempt on goal for the opening 37 minutes. Syracuse was held without a shot attempt or corner in the opening half for the first time since October 14, 2017 — a 2-1 loss to Virginia. The Orange drew just one prior corner, committed more than seven defensive half giveaways, and allowed five penalty corners without sustaining a single offensive attack until Weers gave SU the lead for good.“Set piece plays like penalty corners are becoming more and more important in field hockey,” Weers said. “We just have to keep executing.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse’s penalty corners have now accounted for three of its five goals on the season after Weers scored a goal in SU’s opening win over Vermont off of a corner.The goal spurned a flurry of chances for Syracuse as Bradley stood on the touchline, yelling out for her team to improve its energy and movement across the pitch. The next 10 minutes brought about the Orange’s best of the afternoon, when Syracuse produced five of its seven shots, two of its three corners, and had Albany on its heels for the first time.“They played a definitely better second half,” Bradley said. “And again we’re a young team, that’s the ebbs and flows of a young team.”Early on in the first half, Weers came off the pitch for 70 seconds, sitting on the bench to discuss tactics with assistant head coach Allan Law.Law wrote instructions and drew on his drawing board surrounded by Weers and a few other SU coaches. Even after Weers re-entered the game, Syracuse struggled to deal with the Albany press as the backline failed to connect with the midfield on multiple occasions. The failed connections led to turnovers, which created counterattacking chances for Albany.Late in the second half, SU’s defense was tested, as Albany pulled its goalie with 4:30 remaining to add an extra attacker. In those four minutes and 30 seconds, the Great Danes produced two shots and forced a kick save from sophomore Borg van der Velde. With the extra player, Albany drew five penalty corners, including four successive corners after time expired. As Jamie Martin flicked the ball out of the circle after the fourth corner, SU clinched its second victory of the season. Published on August 26, 2018 at 7:07 pm Contact Anthony: amdabbun@syr.edulast_img read more

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‘Lost season’ brings Trayce Thompson to an uncertain future with Dodgers

first_imgPreviousLos Angeles Dodgers right fielder Trayce Thompson misplays a hit by Chicago White Sox’s Ryan Cordell and allows Cordell to reach second during the fourth inning of a baseball spring exhibition game, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Outfielder Trayce Thompson had two singles, an RBI, a stolen base and scored two runs in the Dodgers’ Cactus League opener against the Chicago White Sox on Friday in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Dodgers outfielder Trayce Thompson, 26, is out of options. The Dodgers cannot send him to the minors again without Thompson clearing waivers first. That is unlikely, so Thompson could be auditioning for 29 other teams this spring even as he tries to fight his way out of a crowded pack of outfielders and back onto the Dodgers’ roster. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Dodgers’ Trayce Thompson steals second during a baseball spring exhibition game against the Chicago White Sox, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Trayce Thompson steals second during a baseball spring exhibition game against the Chicago White Sox, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Trayce Thompson steals second during a baseball spring exhibition game against the Chicago White Sox, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Trayce Thompson steals second during a baseball spring exhibition game against the Chicago White Sox, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)The Dodgers’ Trayce Thompson beats the throw and steals second base in the team’s Cactus League opener against the Chicago White Sox on Friday in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Trayce Thompson leads off second during a baseball spring exhibition game against the Chicago White Sox, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Trayce Thompson runs home during a baseball spring exhibition game against the Chicago White Sox, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Dodgers right fielder Trayce Thompson misplays the double hit by Chicago White Sox’s Ryan Cordell during a baseball spring exhibition game, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Dodgers right fielder Trayce Thompson misplays a hit by Chicago White Sox’s Ryan Cordell and allows Cordell to reach second during the fourth inning of a baseball spring exhibition game, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Outfielder Trayce Thompson had two singles, an RBI, a stolen base and scored two runs in the Dodgers’ Cactus League opener against the Chicago White Sox on Friday in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)NextShow Caption1 of 11Outfielder Trayce Thompson had two singles, an RBI, a stolen base and scored two runs in the Dodgers’ Cactus League opener against the Chicago White Sox on Friday in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)ExpandGLENDALE, Ariz. — Trayce Thompson’s future is uncertain. But at least it’s not his recent past.“He’s probably one of the happiest to turn the page on 2017,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts says of Thompson’s difficult year. “It was just one of those things where anything that could go wrong did go wrong for Trayce.”Dodgers GM Farhan Zaidi calls it “a lost season for him in ’17.” But it really began in 2016.Acquired from the Chicago White Sox the prior offseason, Thompson was hitting .277 with a .905 OPS and 10 home runs in mid-June of his first season as a Dodger. It could not have played out much better for Thompson, who grew up in Southern California. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error “It was a roller coaster. It was a character test, for sure,” Thompson said.The ride could be cranking up again this spring. The 26-year-old Thompson is out of options. The Dodgers cannot send him to the minors again without Thompson clearing waivers first. That is unlikely and Thompson could be auditioning for 29 other teams this spring even as he tries to fight his way out of a crowded pack of outfielders and back onto the Dodgers’ roster.“I think you’re auditioning for yourself in front of everyone every night. It doesn’t matter if you’re here or Dodger Stadium or a back field,” he says to that. “Obviously, you want to do what you can to help the team win. But you’re playing to make a name for yourself every day.”Thompson said he was talking to his brother, Golden State Warriors forward Klay Thompson, about his situation before the start of spring training and Klay texted back a reminder – “Cream always rises to the top.”“I know what I’m capable of,” Trayce says. “These guys, the coaches, everybody knows what I’m capable of. And I think a lot of people in this league know what I’ve done and what I’m capable of. We’ll see what happens.”The Dodgers have nine outfielders in camp with at least some big-league experience. Zaidi says the Dodgers might carry as many as six on their season-opening roster (including utility player Kike’ Hernandez).Complicating matters further for Thompson is the continued presence of Matt Kemp in that group. The former All-Star was acquired in a financially-motivated trade in December. Despite their efforts to move Kemp’s contract, he remains with the Dodgers. Thompson has greater defensive versatility than Kemp and can play all three spots. But if Kemp remains, many of the at-bats that would be available for a right-handed hitting outfielder like Thompson will go to Kemp.“It’s business,” Thompson says. “Matt is a guy I’ve always looked up to since I moved to California. It’s a privilege to have him here and kind of pick his brain. At one point, he was the best player in the game. He still can really hit and do a lot of things.“We can only control what we can control. That’s what I’m focusing on.”All of the outfield candidates have “strong cases to make the roster,” Zaidi says, and there is no doubt in the Dodgers’ front office that Thompson has the ability to be an every-day player in the big leagues. It just might not happen in Los Angeles.“Trayce is a guy you root for,” Roberts says. “He’s healthy. He feels good. … This year is a big year for him, obviously.”NOTESCorey Seager was scheduled to start at designated hitter in the Dodgers’ split-squad game against the San Francisco Giants but he was scratched due to a stomach ailment. Roberts said he expects Seager to be available for Sunday’s game against the Seattle Mariners. … Left-hander Clayton Kershaw will make his spring debut against the Mariners on Sunday. … Right-hander J.T. Chargois, claimed off waivers from the Minnesota Twins on Friday, is expected to take his physical with the Dodgers’ medical staff on Sunday and join the team for Monday’s workout.center_img That seems like a long time ago now. Thompson suffered a back injury in mid-2016 that was difficult to diagnose. Ultimately, two fractures were uncovered and Thompson’s season was over before the All-Star break.The Dodgers handled Thompson carefully in the aftermath and he wasn’t even cleared to play in spring games until mid-March last year.“I was normal from Day One (last spring). I thought so,” Thompson says now. “But I didn’t have a whole lot of reps in spring training. I pushed for it, but they were kind of guarding me. It is what it is.“It showed in my results. I wasn’t myself, you know. I thought in ’15 I really turned a corner baseball-wise with everything – mechanics, production. So to take a step – nine steps really – back was tough.”Thompson opened the season in Triple-A and went hitless in his first 38 at-bats (including an 0-for-8 stretch during a brief April call-up to the Dodgers). The season got better – it could only get better – but Thompson failed to build on the promise he showed before the back injury.last_img read more

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Deontay Wilder’s head trainer explains decision to throw in the towel against Tyson Fury

first_imgThe nature of Wilder’s loss has led to questions over whether he will activate a clause to fight Fury for a third time, but Deas is convinced the bout will take place.”I think so, absolutely,” added the trainer. “Knowing him like I do, he will want the rematch.”These guys have put on two tremendous fights. The public will want it. We’ll want it, they’ll want it. It seems natural. I think it’s what you’ll see happen.” Deontay Wilder’s head trainer, Jay Deas, has said it was not his decision to throw in the towel and concede defeat in Saturday’s much-anticipated rematch with Tyson Fury.Fourteen months on from their drawn first meeting, Wilder was on the receiving end of a heavy beating in Las Vegas as he lost his unbeaten record and WBC heavyweight title to a dominant opponent. However, although Fury bossed the fight, twice sending his bloodied opponent to the canvas, both Wilder and Deas felt the ‘Bronze Bomber’ should have been afforded an opportunity to go out on his shield.MORE: Tyson Fury vs. Anthony Joshua ‘has to happen this year,’ says Eddie HearnCo-trainer Mark Breland threw in the towel during round seven, a decision that was questioned by Deas in a post-fight news conference that Wilder missed in order to go to hospital for treatment on his injured ear.”[Wilder] had a small cut inside the ear, [it] may have affected his equilibrium, so he’s just going to get a couple of stitches there,” explained Deas.Discussing the fight’s ending, Deas added that it wasn’t necessarily his decision to throw in the towel.”I’m the head coach of the team but we do things a little bit differently — 99 percent of the time the head coach of the team is the guy that’s also the lead in the corner.”Ours is a little bit more like a football team, American football, where the head coach doesn’t necessarily call the plays. Ours is a little bit like that, so what happened during the round was Mark [Breland] said something about throwing the towel in and I told him ‘don’t do that,’ I didn’t think he should do that.”Then the fight went a little bit longer and then I saw the towel go in. I haven’t talked to Mark about it but we’ll talk about it, figure out exactly what went on there.”Only three fighters in boxing history have regained the @ringmagazine heavyweight championship: Floyd Patterson, Muhammad Ali and . . . pic.twitter.com/uEdzg9ydAR— Bible of Boxing (@ringmagazine) February 23, 2020Wilder, who hinted he had been hampered by an injury in the lead-up to the contest, expressed his unhappiness in the ring, stating: “I make no excuses tonight. I just wish my corner would have let me go out on my shield – I’m a warrior and that’s what I do.”last_img read more

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